Miami success means Konta is now a serious contender for Slam titles

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While the Premier League and the Boat Race took up most of the British public’s sporting attention this weekend, over in America Johanna Konta was taking her latest step into Tennis’ elite – and now she has her eyes on the Slams.

The Brit defeated former world number one Caroline Wozniacki in straight sets to win the Miami Open.

Only the four Slams hold more prestige and prize money than the Miami event, which is on the WTA tour’s Premier Mandatory billing.

It’s the equivalent to Andy Murray winning an ATP 1000 meeting, and what’s more, Konta had to see off top-quality opponents along the way.

Before meeting Wozniacki in the final, the 25-year-old had to defeat world number five Simona Halep in the quarter-finals, and then a resurgent Venus Williams in the last four.

And victory over the Dane in the final ensured Konta has now won two tournaments already this season, adding to her january success in Sydney.

Konta’s victory in the States has been widely discussed as the biggest British female tennis success since Virginia Wade won Wimbledon in 1977.

And Konta’s form unquestionably means she must be seriously considered to emulate Wade’s victory 40 years ago.

After entering 2017 as a 40/1 shot to win at SW19 this July, our traders have slashed the her odds to just 12/1.

And such is Konta’s stature now that only Serena Williams, Angelique Kerber, Garbine Muguruza and Maria Sharapova – a quartet who have 31 Slams between them – are a shorter price.

But those are the quality of players Konta should be associated with now, and that puts her firmly into Slam-winning territory.

All Odds and Markets are correct as of the date of publishing

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Richard Marsh

Richard loves his sport, especially if it involves the sound of tyres screaming around a race track. He's not fussy though and his '90s Premier League nostalgia and knowledge of team nicknames is tough to match.