Federer will serve his way to Wimbledon immortality in final


As the old sporting saying goes, you are only as good as your last game. This phrase was never more apt than ahead of the 2015 Wimbledon final featuring Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic.

Even by his own outrageously-high standards, Federer’s straight sets win over Andy Murray in the semis was so utterly imperious; the Swiss maestro has to be backed at 11/10 to take Sunday’s final.

Murray was outplayed, out-manoeuvred and most importantly served into SW19 oblivion in one of the most comprehensive displays (and there have been hundreds up to now) of Federer’s astonishing career.

The British number one didn’t do much wrong, he simply came up against the best player ever to wield a tennis racket, playing on his much-loved surface and serving at a phenomenal level.

Federer laid down 20 aces, conceded just a single break point and claimed 84 % of points on his first serve.

By Murray’s own admission it was the finest display of serving he’s ever witnessed from the world number two in 24 matches against him.

Yes, the man standing between the 17-time Grand Slam winner an Open era record eighth Wimbledon title is the same man that thwarted his dreams a year ago, but even 4/5 favourite Djokovic is vulnerable to defeat with Federer in this form.

The pair have faced off six times since that epic five-set final 12 months prior and won three each, taking them to 20-20 in career meetings.

It’s also 1-1 in Wimbledon finals between the pair, so as is so often the case with clashes between these elite men, fine margins will determine the outcome.

Although Djokovic is perhaps the only man alive who could prevent Federer from a date with destiny, on his beloved grass, his stats against Richard Gasquet in his previous match – a far lesser opponent than Murray it must be addded – were around ten per cent lower in most key areas.

At evens money, Federer looks a shrewd bet to be the first player to serve a game to love, while 11/10 says he break serve first.

All Odds and Markets are correct as of the date of publishing.

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