Andy Murray just 6/4 to be world number one again this time next year

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It really has been a sensational year for Andy Murray, and tennis’ new number one could be set to dominate the sport, according to the latest odds.

Our traders have priced up a number of specials for the Scot, who chased down Novak Djokovic’s points lead to finally usurp the Serbian at the top of the rankings last week.

After a record-breaking year which saw the 29-year-old claim a second Wimbledon title, a second Olympic gold plus a season-best eight ATP Tour titles, Murray could be set for more dominance in 2017.

The bookies make it just 6/4 that the Glasgow native is world number one at the end of next year.

And odds of 3/1 to remain at the top of the rankings throughout 2017 suggests that after years of playing second fiddle to Djokovic, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, this is Murray’s moment.

Plus, who is to say Murray won’t dominate the sport for years to come?

The optimistic among you might want to get on the 303/1 for Murray to break Federer’s all-time record of 302 weeks at number one.

And while we’re at it, we’re 50/1 that Murray can do next year what no player has achieved since the great Rod Laver in 1969 – win all four Grand Slams in the same calendar year.

But before all that, there’s at least one more award coming Murray’s way this year. Probably.

The Scot leads the betting for next week’s ATP World Tour Finals at London’s o2 arena at 6/5.

And after being 12/1 earlier in the year to claim the annual BBC Sports Personality of Year, Murray’s incredible second half of 2016 has thrust tennis’ new number one into 1/2 favouritism.

That would be quite an end to what’s been an unforgettable year for Andy Murray.

All Odds and Markets are correct as of the date of publishing

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Richard Marsh

Richard loves his sport, especially if it involves the sound of tyres screaming around a race track. He's not fussy though and his '90s Premier League nostalgia and knowledge of team nicknames is tough to match.