Love Your Club: Peter MacDonald – Greenock Morton

Peter MacDonald is once again plying his trade at Cappielow Park and while the 34-year-old striker has taken the first steps into coaching he still loves nothing more than finding the back of the net.

Former St Johnson ace MacDonald enjoyed a fruitful spell at Dundee but having returned to Morton he knows where his loyalties lie once more.

Here he tells Ladbrokes News why he loves Greenock Morton…

Why do you love Greenock Morton?

Because it’s the team I currently play for and I always love the team I’m playing for!

Describe the fans and what they mean to the club

The fans are what make the game and that’s not just in Scotland but all over the world. It’s always better to have a big crowd.

For a small club every individual person is important to that club be it financially or voicing their support for the team.

What’s the vibe like in the dressing room?

It’s decent we’ve got a big speaker and we blast some tunes. We take it in turns so it depends who grabs the iPod first as to what sort of music we get and what the vibe is like in the gym, and before a game.

Can you name a Morton Backroom Hero?

Andy Bryan has been here 40 years and it’s his testimonial year and he should be recognised more for what he does behind the scenes for the players.

If it’s a double session he’s not getting home until 10 o’clock or even midnight. It’s chaotic for him but nobody sees that they just see him put the kit out in the morning and collect it again in the evening.

What’s the best thing about being a Morton footballer?

Scoring a goal. For me, as a striker, there’s no better feeling than scoring a goal be it first minute or or last minute, your first goal or your latest goal it, can’t be matched and you can’t describe it unless you’ve done it.


Robbie Morris

Robbie studied sports journalism at the University of Gloucestershire, an establishment chosen for its proximity to Cheltenham racecourse, where he was a season ticket holder. Upon graduation, Robbie was a contributor to GolfPunk, a national magazine aimed at ridding golf of its traditionalist image, before joining the team.