Week of success prepares Sanders for make or break April

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As of writing, the last five States to head to the polls and pledge their vote for this year’s Democratic US Presidential Election candidate have all turned out for one name, and that name is Bernie Sanders.

The Vermont Senator claimed victory in Idaho, Utah, Alaska, Hawaii and Washington to leave Hillary Clinton with a single win in Arizona over the past seven days.

In terms of delegates, the wins didn’t do much for Sanders to overhaul Clinton’s significant lead, but they do offer the 8/1 outsider crucial momentum ahead of make or break states.

Finding increasing favour and popularity across the nation, especially among youth and hispanic voters, Sanders could cause shockwaves if he claims any success in the next two major states to head to the polls.

Wisconsin is next up on April 5 with 96 delegates on offer, and after 18-delegate Wyoming on April 9 comes the big one – New York.

With almost 300 delegates on offer, a Sanders victory could be huge both numerically and symbolically in what is Clinton’s home turf.

However Clinton – still a sizeable 1/14 favourite – maintains favour with non-white voters, of whom around 50 per cent make up New York’s population.

But first up is Wisconsin, and for Sanders it represents one of the last few caucuses left to vote.

The 74-year-old has taken 10 of the 12 caucuses held so far, and he was in the Badger State on Saturday night to give a victory speech as the weekend’s results filtered through.

Having claimed neighbouring Michigan despite predictions suggesting a Clinton win, it’s unlikely Sanders will read too much into polls which again say he will be beaten in Wisconsin.

Sitting just under 300 pledged delegates behind Clinton, Sanders appears to be seeking victory in this department in order to swing the vote of the super delegates.

Clinton dominates the super delegate vote thus far with 469 to her rival’s 29, but should Sanders take Wisconsin and New York, many of those could yet switch allegiances.

Brooklyn-born Sanders is set to be the underdog in both states, but he’s playing up to the role, and he has challenged the Clinton camp to a debate in New York, which has received a firm no.

Looking further down the line, if Sanders does build on this snowball effect, then April 26 could be a seismic date in the Democrat calendar as five states take to the polls.

Pennsylvania leads the way with 210 delegates on offer that day, along with Maryland, Connecticut, Delaware and Rhode Island.

This is a huge month for both candidates, but should Sanders take New York, expect his campaign to really kick into action.

All Odds and Markets are correct as of the date of publishing.

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