Do you remember these five defunct European club tournaments?

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UEFA have announced that they plan to introduce a third European competition to go alongside the Champions League and Europa League.

The new tournament won’t begin until the 2021-22 season and looks set to involve some of the continent’s traditionally smaller leagues.

That got us reminiscing about European competitions of old, so we decided to round-up five of the best below.

Intertoto Cup

There was no qualification process to get into the Intertoto Cup – all you had to do was apply.

Plenty did, including Crystal Palace in 1998, who were granted a place despite finishing bottom of the Premier League.

The competition ran from 1961 to 2008, with UEFA Cup places awarded to eventual winners from 1995 onwards.

Inter-Cities Fairs Cup

In an era still recovering from the affects of World War Two, the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup was set up to promote international trade.

The first competition took place across three years and saw a Barcelona XI triumph over a London XI consisting of players from 11 different clubs.

English clubs reached six successive Finals from 1966 to 1971, at which point the tournament began receiving record entries of 48 teams per season.

Cup Winners’ Cup

Talk of the European Cup Winners’ Cup conjures up rose-tinted images of some of Europe’s oldest and most famous names doing battle – and rightly so.

Barcelona, Anderlecht and AC Milan all won the competition between domestic cup winners multiple times. Yet it’s two matches involving English teams which live longest in the memory.

Who could forget David Seaman being lobbed by Nayim in the final minute of extra-time for Real Zaragoza in 1995? Or Tromso versus Chelsea in the snow in 1997?

Though beloved by many, it was abolished in 1999, with Lazio the last team to lift the trophy.

Anglo-Italian Cup

The Anglo-Italian Cup ran intermittently in three spells from 1970 to 1996.

Although initially for professional clubs, the format changed to semi-professional in 1976, with Wimbledon, Bath City and Sutton United all enjoying relative success.

After being discontinued in 1986, it returned once again in 1992 for teams in the Italian and English second-tiers.

Notts County proved the only English winners in its renewed four-year run, beating Ascoli in 1995.

Anglo-Italian League Cup

Not quite as infamous as it’s big brother but an intriguing one nonetheless.

The Anglo-Italian League Cup was played between the English League or FA Cup winners and the Coppa Italia champions.

Swindon Town won the inaugural two-legged affair in 1969, putting AS Roma to the sword 5-2.

Only four more editions would be held before the tournament was scrapped after Napoli’s win in 1976.

All Odds and Markets are correct as of the date of publishing

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Nick Murphy

Nick is a graduate of the University of East Anglia where he doubled up as the sports editor of the student newspaper Concrete. He also supports Dagenham & Redbridge and previously edited the matchday programme at Victoria Road. Other passions include darts, cricket and horse racing.